I once spent hours going back and forth with a client over a letter to the editor. They wanted it to be just right for their president and CEO to sign. They littered clean copy with jargon and industry insider language and I kept taking out all the muck, and made the message simple and on point. Finally, we reached final draft form and I was [more]

In journalism and public relations, a news embargo or press embargo is a request that the information or news provided not be published until a certain date and time, or before certain conditions are met.

Typically, an embargo is set up by emailing a news release to reporters with “embargoed until date/time” written on the [more]

Tagged:

You can have the most well-written and newsworthy press release in the world, but if you send it out on a bad day or at the wrong time, you may hurt your opportunities for news coverage. The day and time you issue a press release matter.

The key questions to consider are:

When will editors and reporters reading their email be most likely [more]
Tagged:

Should I go “off the record”? It’s one of the most common questions I hear from clients I assist with media relations training and support. Even just curious people who find out I work in media relations often want to know how going off the record or “speaking on background” works. What “off the record” [more]

Tagged:

Media relations can be challenging, even for those working in criminal justice or law enforcement, who interact with journalists regularly and rely on them to inform the public about information. In this July 2017 presentation at the annual conference for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP), Ami Neiberger-Miller [more]

As a media relations expert, I am routinely asked how to craft pitching angles or get a story placed with a blog, publication or broadcast outlet. Of course, if you have news – something that is timely, breaking, uniquely interesting, or of great public value – you can often achieve coverage and placement. But what about when [more]

Tagged:

If you want to reach out to bloggers with a story idea or information from your nonprofit, association or small business, what are the best ways to reach out?

As a blogger, I get pitched regularly by people offering me content for my blog. Most pitches are awful – off-topic,  poorly written and unfamiliar with my audience.   [more]

We conducted an in-person media relations training for an association client that sought to better understand how to work with the media and suggest ideas for story coverage.

—As part of the training, participants:

Understood who the media are, their deadlines, and working environments. Learned how to write a press release. —Discussed [more]

The Washington Post recently caused a stir by inviting people to pitch the editorial board. Most editorial boards enjoy hearing from readers and appreciate input – especially if it is thoughtful and well-assembled. But most of them don’t do what the Post did and put up an online form to help you make your pitch. Before you pitch the [more]

Intuition and strategy play big roles in media relations. There are times that you need to listen to your gut, and times when you just have to execute. But it can be easy to make a mistake, even while executing an awesome strategy. The last thing you want to do is introduce a problem that could have been avoided. Here are six common media [more]

Tagged:

The  annual PR PowerLines survey of journalists was published in January 2015, and the results offer tips on getting your news release read (and used) by journalists, that can assist small business owners, nonprofit workers or association professionals.

Tip #1 – Send press releases to journalists via email. Email distribution [more]

Tagged:

This presentation offers tips for journalists on covering trauma and working with survivors of trauma. The presentation was delivered at Columbia University in New York by Ami Neiberger-Miller while she was working for the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS).

Journalists: Covering Traumatic Events with Sensitivity [more]

This moving story interviewed children of fallen service members for a Memorial Day weekend piece in 2012 featured on CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360. Steppingstone LLC’s Ami Neiberger-Miller worked with the producers on a concept for the story and then she worked with TAPS staff to locate children who would be comfortable [more]

Writing a press release may seem like a chore, but it’s really a great tool to use to share information about your organization, association or company. But it’s important to be succinct and clear – journalists spend on average, less than one minute reviewing your press release before hitting the delete button or deciding to get [more]

Three out of four journalists say they are feeling more pressure to think about how a story could potentially be shared on social media, says a new survey by Muckrack and Edelman of 251 journalists in late 2014. This means the stakes are going up for everyone who hopes to see a story in print, on the air, in the sound waves or online. We have [more]

Building relationships with journalists is key to nurturing stories and managing your organization or company’s reputation in the news media. Twitter offers some great ways to nurture relationships with reporters and improve your visibility and understanding of what they are covering and how they work. Pitching a journalist [more]

I once  had a client with a very localized story in the DC area say to me – maybe you can get Christiane Amanpour to cover it! It was not likely at the time, given that Amanpour was across the world and very focused on reporting in conflict zones.

But Amanpour’s influence as America’s most well-known foreign correspondent [more]

Requesting a correction to a news story is a delicate business – and it’s easy for even a well-branded and iconic nonprofit organization to make a mistake. The American Red Cross recently sent a 12-page list of corrections to ProPublica and NPR over an investigative  series highlighting serious concerns about its [more]

Associated Press reporter Michael Biesecker’s story earlier this month about three slain National Guard troops caught some heat from online comment posters, who noted that a spouse was listed for the two males who died, but not the female soldier who died. Some alleged homophobism, as the fallen female soldier left behind a wife. [more]

Imagine you are the well-compensated (I can hear my nonprofit readers chuckling now) executive director of a taxpayer-funded nonprofit agency that oversees a 15 acre public park. A newspaper reporter emails you and requests to know your salary. Instead of responding before the reporter’s deadline, you email a public relations [more]
This graphic is circulating online in a big way. It references Komen’s ubiquitous pink products, and makes it clear that a revolt is underway among the foundation’s core audiences, who are refusing to march lockstep in brand unison on this decision.

Like many nonprofit PR pros, I’ve been following the fireworks [more]

The New York City newsroom for the Associated Press

I’m often asked by other nonprofit public relations professionals, how I know so many reporters who cover stories relevant to my clients. So often people seem fixated on the media outlet names, and not the relationships. The relationships are what matters.

Tip #1: Change your [more]

Yesterday I offered some tips for building relationships with journalists so you can share story ideas and talk with them about topics that matter to your nonprofit. Here’s a few more tips.

Tip #3: Be willing to be helpful. Seriously, it is not hard to be helpful to reporters. If they need help understanding statistics or reports [more]

When nonprofit staff are scared of the press, they often think of images like this one, showing a besieged official being swarmed by media, not a one-on-one interview in a non-hostile setting.

The White House is not the only place that sometimes has trouble keeping the peace with journalists – sometimes nonprofits do too. The first [more]

Media Follow-Up & Key Partnerships Take an Ad Council PSA Campaign to #1

Situation: One in seven children is sexually solicited online, and the majority of these solicitations go to teen girls. Yet parents don’t know how to talk with teens about this important issue. In 2004, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children [more]

Top

Pin It on Pinterest