If your New Year’s resolution was to improve your presence on Twitter for yourself, your business or your employer, then here are a few problem behaviors to avoid with some tips on how to improve:

Problem #1: Not educating yourself about Twitter. It takes time to learn about hashtags, craft witty (or at least interesting) 140 [more]

Tying your cause into a designated awareness day, week, or month on the calendar is a common public relations tool to draw attention to your work and your nonprofit organization. Here’s five reasons why you should try it.

Reason #1 – Creating a holiday or awareness day draws a catalyst of attention to your cause or issue. Yes, [more]

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Mining editorial calendars can help you plan your PR outreach efforts and be successful. Photo via Creative Commons.

There’s a secret tool to help public relations professionals plan their story pitches in advance for magazines, major blogs and other publications – editorial calendars.  Published months in advance, [more]

With the heyday of self-publishing and on-demand printing in full swing, anyone can become a book author for minimal cost. Nonprofit organizations are among those who are starting to publish their own books. Writing a book can help your nonprofit organization in several ways:

(1) Tell your story on your terms – a published book [more]

The sister city movement links together hundreds of grassroots and autonomous local nonprofit organizations. To help its member organizations improve their public relations outreach, Sister Cities International issued a communications toolkit to assist them. Originally compiled on a CD for distribution at the annual conference [more]

Since yesterday’s post was about how to make friends and market yourself or your organization on Twitter, it only makes sense that today I would offer some advice on behaviors to avoid on Twitter that don’t help you make friends. If you want to make more friends and engage more effectively on Twitter, you’ll want to [more]

Making friends and marketing yourself or your organization on Twitter may seem daunting to someone who is just starting. Or you may have joined Twitter a while ago, but feel like your efforts have stagnated. How do you go about getting a foothold on Twitter and finding friends? Here are five tips to help:

Tip #1 – Know what you want [more]

Giving a great speech that motivates and inspires is not easy. It requires finesse, tact, and knowledge. It’s easy when you work for a cause, to assume that giving a speech will be easier if you are passionate about the topic. After all, this isn’t your tenth grade English class where you’ve been tasked to write a speech [more]

New York Times Haggler columnist David Segal recently called out the entire public relations industry for its spammy email tactics. And it was a trouncing our industry deserved. For far too long, PR flacks have extracted thousands of email addresses for reporters from expensive databases that they subscribe to, and then blast-emailed [more]

Video Cue Cards: How to Format Them

Saturday, December 7, 2013

We all love effortless looking videos about the organizations and issues we care about, but it often takes a little magic behind the scenes to ensure that key points are delivered effectively. While I prefer to have a thoughtful spokesperson on camera with presence who can fling sound bytes effortlessly without a prompt, many people [more]

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Video production is becoming a bigger player in nonprofit and association communications, as the cost of gathering footage becomes cheaper and anyone can produce video footage on an iPhone, iPad, FlipCam, webcam or other digital camera. While collecting video footage is easier than ever before, many organizations still need to hire [more]

Your blog can be a centerpiece for marketing your business, nonprofit organization or association, and I got some great tips from Deborah Brody at the 2013 PRSA Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference. I’ve followed Deborah on Twitter for a couple of years (@DBMC) and she always has great insights. Her presentation slides [more]

I spoke yesterday on “We’re Not Victims, We’re Survivors: Engaging the Media on Sensitive Topics” at the PRSA Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference. The conference was well-organized and I enjoyed talking with other PR professionals about social media and got a little inspiration to improve communications [more]

I got a note last week indicating that my proposal for a session called: “We Don’t Speak as Victims, We Speak as Survivors: Engaging the Media on Sensitive Topics”  was accepted for the PRSA Mid-Atlantic District Chesapeake Conference being held June 25, 2013 in Columbia, Maryland. I’ve never attended this conference [more]

Arin Greenwood of Huffington Post talks for a packed lunch crowd while Gwen Flanders of USA Today looks on nearby.

The Independent Public Relations Alliance  recently held a packed house lunchtime program “Secrets to Getting Ink in Traditional and Digital Media” near Tyson’s Corner with journalists from The [more]

Facebook released a guide this month to help nonprofits improve their relationship-building and marketing through Pages. If you’ve been managing a Pages account for a long time, it’s a great refresher on best practices, but there’s not a lot of new content. If you are new to managing Pages for a nonprofit or association, [more]

Want to know how journalists are using social media and how you can connect with them about stories? Welcome guest blogger Anne Singer, who summarized a National Press Club Panel called Twitch! (Twitter + Pitch)  that happened during Social Media Week. Anne Singer specializes in policy PR and is currently Communications Director [more]

In the last week, I have talked with two different nonprofit organizations working to convert printed books to e-book formats. As communicators are asked to apply their skills to ever more media formats, many are starting to get involved in mobile media.

While a great writer can write anything, it’s important to understand [more]
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It is almost always a bad idea to auto-feed your Twitter posts to your organization’s Facebook page. Here’s five things to consider when thinking about it:

Realize that the expectations are very different for an organization vs. a person. Even if you are the most succinct and funny Twitter writer ever, and your organization [more]

I really enjoyed attending the “Perfect Pitch” workshop organized by the PRSA-NCC chapter yesterday. The event included a panel discussion with four journalists: (1) Dion Haynes –  real estate editor for The Washington Post, (2) Jayne O’Donnell – retail reporter for USA Today, (3) Hank Silverberg [more]

It’s important for nonprofits and associations to be strategic when it comes to social media, especially when they are smaller organizations, because they don’t have a lot of resources and staff are often multi-tasked. During the discussion at my table for PRSA/NCC’s Second Annual Public Relations Issues of the Day [more]

I get 150-200 emails during a typical workday – easily. I need to monitor news about my clients, get correspondence from those clients, network for my business, and stay up to date on developments relevant to the issues I work on.

And I’m not alone in feeling like I am drowning, on a daily basis, in email. The Los Angeles Times [more]

During what time of day are people more likely to read your pithy comment and interact with your nonprofit organization on social media sites?

An infographic from AllTwitter on Mediabistro distills the best advice on when to post to Facebook, Twitter. LinkedIn, Pinterest and Google+ for the maximum impact looking at when traffic [more]

There’s an insightful and detailed “The Cable” article this morning looking at the public relations fiasco with a press statement issued by the U.S. embassy in Cairo this week on the Foreign Policy website. The article examines the inner workings of the enormous PR flap created by a Cairo Embassy staffer who [more]

When I first started working at an international nonprofit organization as their communications director several years ago – I confronted a terrible problem familiar to many nonprofit professionals – the staff were using complicated graduate school level language when they wrote copy for the newsletter and the website. [more]

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